Essay 3: True-to-life scenario in social work practice.
Essay 3: True-to-life scenario in social work practice.
In this Discussion, you apply ethical decision making to a true-to-life scenario in social work practice. This activity takes place in the Discussion Board, but you do not need to respond to your peers. This Discussion works as follows:
You must post your initial Day 3 response before you are able to see the responses of your colleagues.Your online classroom Instructor will post a general response that applies to the breadth of the responses (i.e., responses this week will not be individualized).Then, for the Day 6 response, follow the instructions below. Again, your online classroom Instructor will post a general response that applies to the breadth of the responses (i.e., responses this week will not be individualized).The goal of this activity is to simulate how a change in circumstance or information can affect your ethical decision-making process—and in that way mirror common situations in actual practice.
To PrepareRead Chapter 12 in the course text.Review the NASW Code of Ethics.Review the Ethical Decision-Making Tree.Review the scenarios below and choose one to respond to for this Discussion.Scenario 1
You are in the first weeks of your internship, and you hear the employees discussing a client in the hallway. They are using terms like “junkie,” “loser,” and “hopeless.” How do you handle this situation?
By Day 6Imagine that each scenario has changed in the following way:Scenario 1
You overhear the colleagues share that the client stated he wanted to “die,” and if he didn’t get admitted, he would “kill himself.” One of the colleagues stated, “He always says that—he’s never going to go through with it. Just ignore him.”
ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER HERE
You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.
Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.
Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.
The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.
Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : ORDER NOW

× How can I help you?