Critical Thinking Literature Questions

Part One: A&P by John Updike

Question One

Yes, the story’s climax is as significant as it sounds because it is after Sammy’s comment that things start to fall. Attendants at the shop judge people by appearances, but Sammy learns that there is an inner self he does not know, and the lack of it makes him judge the world wrongly. Sammy’s tone does not match the events because he speaks arrogantly to prove to other colleagues that they do not know what the girls want. However, he faces shame at the end of the story by realizing that he has a weak inner self Critical Thinking Literature Questions.

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Question Two

Sammy is within the stage of transitioning from adolescence to adulthood, an age, he feels he can defend girls when they face authority. The author also reveals his age is still childhood for parents because Sammy still has to answer them. When compared to other colleagues, Sammy thinks he is an adult because he is technically an adult. Therefore, he is of the same age as his coworker, Stokesia, three years older and married with two kids. When he thinks of the old lady that spent her lifetime cashing the stock register, he imagines old ladies must have a boring life because of their age. The author reveals young girls are relatable because of their youthful zest based on how Sammy sees them. Later, he learns Lengel, his boss, is older after realizing his rash decision was an immature act. Sammy’s final thought about different age sets lead him to his action to quit the job, a consequence, he must pay for not ‘growing up. ‘ After leaving, he learns he is not youth as the girls and must face the consequences as an adult; this realization contributes to the theme of ‘growing up.’ Critical Thinking Literature Questions

Question Three

The story’s setting is an A&P store where people of different ages and gender meet when doing shopping. Sammy’s interaction with the girls and other colleagues leads him to learn the significance of growing up. The details about space contribute to the story by enabling the setting of the stage on which characters interact with people of different ages, revealing the challenges Critical Thinking Literature Questions.

Part Two: The Veldt by Ray Bradbury

Question One

George and Lydia are characterized as living in modern smart homes where technology allows them to experience the lifestyles of different environments. However, they feel technology has made them lack purpose because their children are fixated on it. For example, George thinks the nursery is a cat’s meow, meaning a destructive force to his children. Lydia feels powerless because the kids spent more time on virtual reality in Africa. The reason for their differences in their approach to teaching the children good morals. George believes the technology is good because it occupies the kids’ minds and prevents them from engaging in bad behaviors; therefore, he does not have to face resentment for punishing them. In contrast, Lydia’s state of powerlessness is that she is not strict enough to become addicted to the automated nursery Critical Thinking Literature Questions.

Question Two

George is not worried at first, but he starts to worry because his role as a father begins to clash with children’s addiction to the violent African virtual reality. This marks the rising action, and climax is reached when he notes the children are talking back to him. At this point, he starts to realize the technology is harmful to his family and must choose whether to keep or destroy it. George’s decision to let the game control his family marks the falling action.

Question Three

The choice between Peter and Wendy and the parents is about the theme of progress versus tradition. I would choose both because the battle between technology and traditionalists is featured using the motif of the pedestrian, who represents a person that can maintain traditional values despite the onslaught of technological advances. The choice of an African veldt will negatively affect children’s relationship with their parents. As revealed by Bradley about how Peter and Wendy start developing animalistic behaviors, the same would happen if such a violent technology is adopted. This might affect the story because the theme of progress versus tradition would not apply. Moreover, the present storyline depicts Children as the villain and parents as heroes. However, the latter story would only feature villains because there will be nothing to prevent children from becoming inhuman Critical Thinking Literature Questions.

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